Research Council

Radical openness towards the past

The complex history of Castrum Peregrini has been subject to research of historians, literature scholars, sociologists and artists. Despite the many and good studies that exist there is a growing demand for research into areas such as resistance, subversive strategies, the relation of arts, crafts and community as well as ideology and politics of the apolitical e.a.

It is equally and especially important to shed light on power relations, sexual dependencies and group dynamics as well as on issues of gender, race and class.

We want to encourage all independend research related to the many histories of Castrum Peregrini. The archives that are accessible in our premises are open for all serious researchers.

In the light of the recent interest in possible sexual abuse in the circles around Wolfgang Frommel we support all efforts to shed light on this troubled past.

Proposals of research projects will be put forward to our research council chaired by Prof. Rosemarie Buikema (University of Utrecht). The council will appraise applications and support researchers. Later in 2017 the council will also publish their own research agenda.

Applications for use of our archives can be put forward to mail@castrumperegrini.nl

 

Research council

 

Prof. Rosemarie Buikema, University of Utrecht, NL (chair)

Prof. Ernst van Alphen, Leiden University, NL

Prof. Aleida Assmann, Universität Konstanz, DE

Dr. Ursula Langkau-Alex, International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam, NL

VERGANGENHEITSBEWÄLTIGUNG

“We all carry the Castrum story in us. It has settled in the corners of memory, taken various shapes that we bring to the surface from time to time, from this we can piece a puzzle. And then it will gain a face and others will look at it as one does at a portrait. But everyone will see something else. “

Documentary maker Janina Pigaht uses this quote of Gisèle to end her film Herengracht 401’ a fascinating portrait of Castrum Peregrini in times where it needed to reinvent itself after the death of Gisèle in 2013. Janina followed Castrum Peregrini and its current and former inhabitants over the period of two years. Unfortunately not all former inhabitants that are still alive wanted to speak on film. But for instance Joke Haverkorn did and Christiane Kuby and it became clear that their relationship and their past with Castrum Peregrini was all but simple. Their living at Castrum Peregrini was a life changing experience,- in the very positive and the very negative sense they had experienced a community that cared and at the same time cut itself off from the outside world, that gave love, but also demanded love, that empowered its friends but also made it difficult to leave.

We supported the production of the film in whatever way we could and are happy that it is there as a starting point for a conversation and further research. It was premiered at the Nederlands Film Festival in 2016 and consequently screened at Castrum Peregrini, followed by a discussion with the audience and the maker chaired by prof. Rosemarie Buikema (UU). It was shown at the Stadsarchief Amsterdam and the Amsterdam Museum, again with a public discussion. Also in seminars at the University of Amsterdam, Lars has engaged in discussions with students about the film and about dealing with a difficult and multifaceted past.

Another quote in the film, by Andreas Burnier, sums up the absurdities and impossibilities of the community around Wolfgang Frommel, including its view on pedagogical eros. The quote ends “…still, it was nice there” / “…en toch was het er fijn” (read the whole quote in Dutch, p. 134 ‘Andreas Burnier. Metselaar van de wereld’- E. Lockhorn). This strangely beautiful but disturbing quote leads to an important insight: the past of Castrum Peregrini, like that of many war related communities, like that of many reform communities, of many communities around charismatic figures is a story of light and dark, of joy and suffering, of growth and stagnation.

For us at Castrum Peregrini today, this dytochomy became clear from the moment when we engaged in the community and the activities of Castrum Peregrini. Wolfgang Frommel (1902-1986) was already dead and his circle of mainly male disciples was determined to maintain a hermetic, closed community driven by the spirit of Wolfgang Frommel and Stefan George. In sharp contrast we found Gisèle who has always embraced change and looking forward. One of Gisèle’s main characteristics was her approach to friends: once a friend always a friend. She never broke with anyone and bridged all difficulties with her ability to see beauty and possibilities next to where others saw faults and impossibilities. Her vision was certainly also selective but she represented the light and playful where Wolfgang Frommel represented the dark and worrisome. At least in our perception. So as a role model, we put her centre stage in building the new Castrum Peregrini. Also we realised that the male dominated circle around Wolfgang Frommel had given Gisèle a marginal role in their story of Castrum Peregrini. There was some justice to be done,- as Gisèle has not only made the venture possible in financial terms, also as an artist, a networker, and a strong female voice she identified with ‘her’ Castrum Peregrini and struggled for it all her life.

Still it was obvious and is obvious that Wolfgang Frommel cannot purely be pushed to the archive, although this would be a valid move: the archive is there, as we know through Aleida Assmann (‘Seven forms of forgetting’ – 1 October 2014) a.o., to responsibly forget, that means to keep knowledge available for future generations and take ones institutional role of offering a canon on display that is relevant for the present day society. And we believe that Wolfgang Frommels story is not helpful to address the pressing social issues of today that we want to and have to deal with.

Nevertheless Vergangenheitsbewältigung as it is called in Germany, coming to terms with the past, is essential. In 2007 Thomas Karlauf, one of the former inhabitants of Castrum Peregrini and a disciple of Wolfgang Frommel, wrote his much acclaimed critical biography Stefan George Die Entdeckung des Charisma. This biography ends after the death of George in 1933 with the execution of the Hitler assassin Von Stauffenberg, from the George circle. In Kreis Ohne Meister. Stefan Georges Nachleben. that was published two years later in 2009 Ulrich Raulff sketches the development of the various communities around the globe in which George lead an afterlife in sub-circles of his disciples. About Amsterdam and Castrum Peregrini Raulff mentions only that he could not elaborate too extensively as he did not get access to Castrum ’s archives. The former director of Castrum Peregrini, Manuel Goldschmidt and his friend and central Castrum Peregrini figure Claus Victor Bock had always prevented historical critical use of the Castrum Peregrini archives. We, the current Castrum Peregrini generation, have always promoted open access and coming to terms with pasts. That was not taken well by the older male generation, that then still lived. Manuel Goldschmidt, on his personal title, took a big part of the archive, donated it to The Literature Museum in The Hague and legally locked it for free use: only a small circle of his friends can give access*. Castrum Peregrini has led for years a lawsuit against this action to get the archive back or at least achieve unconditional access for all serious researchers.

 

Ute Frevert

When these two books were published we immediately gave the authors Karlauf and Raulff a stage and provided for the possibility for all interested public to discuss these complex histories critically. And we did so whenever an opportunity occurred, such as when Joke Haverkorn published her Entfernte Erinnerungen an W in 2013. During the Symposium Freundschaft (December 2013) with a.o. a keynote by Ute Frevert director Max Planck Institute Berlin the panel discussion chaired by Nicole Colin (UvA), the elder generation of Castrum Peregrini friends present in the room fiercely opposed the critical narrative of Haverkorn and also attacked us for supposedly pushing Wolfgang Frommel from his pedestal. But that was and is not even the question for us. It is not about the iconic value of a figure, it is for us about a historic correct image and an open discourse about it, be it scholarly, artistically or in oral history.

Joachim Umlauf, Josef Früchtl, Ute Frevert

At the moment we await with great excitement the publication of the complete correspondence of Wolfgang Frommel and Buri Wongtschowski, which will be edited in our own imprint Castrum Peregrini – Neue Folge, in summer 2017, and which will shed a critical light on their relationship and its implications for Castrum Peregrini. We hope to engage the public in a debate during a public book launch in autumn 2017.

Early 2018 we also expect the biography that Annet Mooij writes about Gisèle. As Gisèle‘ s life will be presented in her own social context we expect insights and questions also about Wolfgang Frommel and the wider circle of Castrum Peregrini in that time.

Nicole Collin, Joke Haverkorn

As a disciple of the German poet Stefan George Wolfgang Frommel gave the impression that he tried to copy his masters form of living in a circle of friends that sustain his daily life, materially and mentally and also in terms of love and affection. But Thomas Karlauf has made it very clear in his essay ‘Meister mit eigenem Kreis’ that Wolfgang Frommel has built his own familia spiritualis, his own circle, with new rituals, rules and unspoken codes of conduct.

Karlauf ‘s historic analysis as well as the personal story of Joke Haverkorn, Anais van Ertvelde who published ‘The Many Manifestations of Castrum Peregrini and the film of Janina Pigaht are now supplemented by an essay (Vrij Nederland) of Frank Ligtvoet. We hope that there are more works to come and to create an opportunity to bring these voices, both the voices of the witnesses and those of the objective researchers, together in a (online) collection of documents. This will support public discussions and further research.

We found the Gisèle quote in the beginning of this text in her diary. She wrote it down at the moment when Claus Bock, one of her and Wolfgang Frommels youngsters in hiding, meanwhile Professor of Germanic studies in London, had taken a sabbatical to write his memoires of his time in hiding at Herengracht 401, in Amsterdam, code named Castrum Peregrini. Gisèle had high hopes in this story of the community at Herengracht 401 but was utterly disappointed when she first read the final manuscript. Claus had written, to put it mildly, a selective and rather ideological memory of the beginning of Castrum Peregrini. Wolfgang Frommel was clearly the protagonist and any difficult or problematic aspects of the time in hiding – power relations, use and abuse of dependencies, emotional, erotic, psychological tensions, were sublimated under the credo of art and poetry that had guided the group through the storms of persecution.

We have lived in the memories of all inhabitants for years. These are represented in the house, the interiors, the archives of Castrum Peregrini. In the last years of Gisèle’s life we have formed a close little family with her, until she died at the age of a 100 years in 2013. Gisèle was for us a living example of a life in friendship and in art. This is our legacy that we want to maintain. We do this as a learning organisation,- together with our public, with artists, scholars and critical thinkers. Our past, also the difficult and dark sides of our past, are our motivation to keep asking questions about today’s societies. We have to constantly deconstruct our past in order to construct new stories for the future. We labelled these activities with ‘Memory Machine’. It is a calling and a duty for us to deal with the past and we embrace all collaborators in these efforts.

July 2017 – Michael Defuster, Frans Damman, Lars Ebert

 

* The heir of Wolfgang Frommel, Manuel Goldschmidt, had donated the archive of Frommel to Literatuurmuseum Den Haag. The heir of Goldschmidt is the Wolf van Cassel Stichting, Utrecht, which can give permission to consult Frommels archive. The Wolf van Cassel Stichting publishes a  series of books called De Roos with the old Castrum Peregrini logo, which we stopped using when we set a new course.

The pending lawsuit is about contested ownership of parts of the archive and Castrum Peregrinis stance of radical openness.

International Conference on Participation in the Arts

Save the Date!

European Academy of Participation
International Conference

26-27 October 2017
Living as Form

 

EAP_Logoformats_4cThe European Academy of Participation (EAP) brings together ten higher education and arts & culture organisations from all over Europe.  EAP sets out to make a contribution to a more inclusive Europe, in which people live together in mutual respect of their differences. Participatory practice in art and culture is a central tool to involve communities in a positive process of constructing a shared cultural space.

The conference will include a key note address, presentations and workshops to engage creative producers, cultural practitioners, artists, academics, educators, arts & culture organisations and higher education institutions in a critical dialogue and a rich exchange.

The full programme and a possibility to register will be published here Mid August 2017.

This two-day international conference in Amsterdam about participatory art in education and culture, with keynote presentations, panel discussions, workshops, sharing of challenging practice and peer-to-peer exchange focusses on:

  • the relations of culture and education

How does education prepare artists for work in communities? How is artistic and community practice intertwined with educational offers? What international benchmarks are available and how can culture and education learn from one another?

  • the international agenda

How is internationalisation of education taking shape? What good practice can we share of border crossing artistic and community work? How to match the international and the local in cultural programmes?

 

The conference will present and discuss cutting edge initiatives that bridge the gap between education and culture, between the national and the international perspective, such as

  • the EAP intensive Higher Education course offer jointly developed and delivered by universities and cultural centres
  • Tandem Projects Community Participation
  • The EAP Tuning Document, a European benchmark document of artistic competencies
  • Sharing Academy, The Art of Impact, Leeuwarden European Capital of Culture

Who?

Main organiser is Castrum Peregrini, Amsterdam, The Netherlands representing the EAP – European Academy of Participation Consortium:

  • Goethe-Institut, Munich/Lyon, Germany
  • ACERT, Tondela / Pele, Porto, Portugal
  • Avrupa Kultur Dernegi, Istanbul, Turkey
  • National University of the Arts Bucharest, Romania
  • Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts, London, UK
  • University of Marseille, France
  • Universidad de la Iglesia de Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • ELIA The European League of Institutes of the Arts, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Create, Dublin, Ireland;

In collaboration with Fonds Voor Cultuurparticipatie, Tandem for Culture, Community Participation (European Cultural Foundation/MitOst) and A Sharing Academy (Merlijn Twaalfhoven), Goethe Institut Amsterdam and representatives of the Willem De Kooning Academy Rotterdam, DAS Art Amsterdam and HKU.

For whom?

Artists, curators, producers, community and institutional leaders, teachers, researchers and critics, from the Netherlands and internationally.

Through the EU project EAP and its funding and the Tandem Community we expect a minimum of 50 practitioners and academics from at least 10 European countries. Through the national network of Castrum Peregrini, Fonds Voor Cultuurparticipatie, A Sharing Academy and Willem De Kooning Academy Rotterdam, DAS Art Amsterdam and HKU we expect 70 participants from across the Netherlands.


Why?

The conference Living as Form

  • follows up on previous project based conferences Participation on Trial (Amsterdam, October 2014), European Academy of Participation (Dublin, October 2016),
  • concludes the 2nd year of the EU project European Academy of Participation,
  • brings together international and national initiatives towards synergies.

Living as Form wants to discuss

  • the possibilities of a formalised educational offer for artists
  • the role of institutionalised education and its relation to ‘in situ’ education
  • and their relation to the cultural, social and political field.

At the same time it applies a perspective that is both local and international. The conference therefore wants to critically discuss the embeddedness of participatory practice in an international framework that has rapidly changed in the last two years. Before that participatory art has largely been perceived through the historical lens of what happed since the fall of the Berlin wall. The ‘end of history’-feeling has led to the long prevailing paradigm of neoliberalism, our current political order of free trade and open markets. In this paradigm the private sector takes the lead and the role of the public and that of the state supporting the public is pushed to the background. Simultaneously, alongside the positive effects of participation in and through art and culture, the term participation has been appropriated by the neoliberal policies to stress the fact that individuals need to take their own responsibility versus a withdrawing welfare state. Political support focussed on the economy and the financial market, not the citizen. In turn, and quite ironically, citizens and artists were expected to compensate for austerity politics, being manoeuvred into roles that would ‘art wash’ a misery that should have actually been solved by other professionals: care takers, city planners, social workers etc..

Meanwhile the world has changed. One could believe that in countries like the USA, Britain, Poland, the Netherlands and Hungary, the revolutionary potential of people and their representatives, long considered to be the domain of the left, is now with populist and nationalist movements that battle principles of enlightenment such as human rights, equality and solidarity. In the fake and factless news their representatives produce, expertise, high end culture and, consequently, artists are framed as the enemies of the ‘people’. Nevertheless, the basic question stays the same: how can artists engage with communities in a mutual beneficial way, towards progress and more culturally and economically inclusive societies?

Nato Thompson, from whom we borrow the title of this conference, asks whether it is time at the beginning of the 21st century to return Duchamps urinal from the museum to the real world. But the question arises whether it would be accepted by the ‘real world’ today, where one is suspicious towards arts and the artists in their elite bubble. Art keeps engaging with life, trying to find new forms of expression and impact. What is the artistic form of live today, or should we rather talk about art as resistance? And how does education prepare the artists of the future for their role in these new realities?

Castrum Peregrini Dialogue

We have realised the first round of our think tank, the Castrum Peregrinin Dialogue, with the generous support of the Pauwhoff Fund and in close partnership with the European Cultural Foundation and the Dialogue Advisory Group. The latter – an internationally acclaimed group of peace mediators- holds office here in our premises.

The ECF is a kindred organisation that is close to our heart in many respects. With our own history as a hiding place in which art, culture and friendship helpt young people to survive in this house we embrace ECFs mission to strive for an open, democratic and inclusive Europe within which culture is a valued and key contributor.

Together Castrum Peregrini and the ECF share the desire to develop viable concepts of living together in diversity.

In our recent publication The House of Gisèle we have published Kenan Maliks wonderful article Living in Diversity, a lecture that he delivered when we launched the house of Gisèle and Job Cohen unveiled a plaque at our building in May 2016. We took Kenans tekst as a motivation, a framing paper so to speak to bring together a divers group of thinkers from all walks of life and various disciplines to meet three times in one year for 2,5 days and analyse in a conversation, the root causes of fragmentation in Europe and the world today and what we need to take into account when thinking about how living in diversity can work. We tried to balance participation of man and woman, younger and older generation, white and non-white, various religious backgrounds. Also we made sure that we create a protected environment, apply Chatham House Rules for instance, so that everyone feels safe and can speak up, be vulnerable and engage in a dialogue that is based on learning from one another in the first place. Our experience is that our heritage – like the studio of Gisèle – offers a frame, physically and spiritually, which makes those conversations more easy, respectful and intense.

Also we engaged two experienced moderators, Avrum Burg, members of our board of recommendation, author and former speaker of the Knesset as well as Ram Manikkalingam, director of the Dialogue Advisory Group, seconded by Fleur Ravensbergen.

We work to a set agenda, everybody of the 20 participants around the table gives a short input to a certain session, like social justice, and then we speak for 1,5 hours, before we go to the next session. All is reported and after three meetings we bundle it to share it with opinnleaders, programme makers, activists etc. For this first round of meetings 2016/17 we strive to publish outcomes by December 2017.

Participants
  1. Avraham Burg, author, former politician, a.o. speaker of the Knesset (moderator)
  2. Ram Manikkalingam, director Dialogue Advisory Group (moderator)
  3. Fleur Ravensbergen, deputy director Dialogue Advisory Group (moderator)
  4. Mirjam Shatanawi, curator Middle East and North Africa, Tropen Museum, NL (rapporteur)
  5. Brian Burgoon, Director Institute for Social Science Research, University of Amsterdam, NL
  6. Adeola Enigbokan, Social Scientist, Amsterdam/New York
  7. Quinsy Gario, poet, artist, activist, NL
  8. Osman Kavala, president Anadolu Kültür, Istanbul, TR
  9. Charl Landvreugd, artist, curator, writer, Rotterdam, NL
  10. Kenan Malik, writer, lecturer, broadcaster, London, UK
  11. Dominique Moïsi, political scientist and writer, Paris, FR
  12. Wendelien van Oldenborgh, artist, representing NL at 2017 Venice Biennale, NL
  13. Thijs Tromp, Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds, Amsterdam, NL
  14. Diana Pinto, cultural historian, Paris, FR
  15. Jordi Vaquer, regional director for Europe at Open Society, ES
  16. Katherine Watson, director European Cultural Foundation, Amsterdam, NL
  17. Gloria Wekker, Anthropologist and author, NL
  18. Gertraud Auer Borea d’Olmo, secretary general Bruno Kreisky Forum, Vienna, AT

Artist Weekend: Women and Resistance

Artist Weekend: Women and Resistance

Remembering is repetition. Remembering is the only confusion. Do you understand?

by Amber Coomans

5 – 7 May 2017

As a heritage student, something I learned on the first day was that history is constructed. Heritage is a label that people stick onto something they find important. This Artist Weekend is about that very aspect of history: how come when we google the word resistance (verzet in Dutch), only one woman pops up in Google Images?

From Friday May 5th until Sunday May 7th I attended Castrum Peregrini’s first Artist Weekend: Women and Resistance, a weekend full of artist talks, debates, presentations and film screenings. The weekend is part of a yearlong program titled The Female Perspective, which focuses on questions of female identity, feminism and gender, both in relation to the historical context of Castrum Peregrini and its founder Gisèle van Waterschoot van der Gracht. I watched this weekend, obviously, through my own eyes: a young heritage student with many questions about history, heritage and also about Gisèle’s own affinity with the female identity which was broadly debated this weekend.

The weekend opens with an introduction by curator Nina Folkersma, in which she explains more about the Female Perspective in relation to Castrum Peregrini: the house of female artist Gisèle, where she worked and lived, is the perfect place for such an event. Castrum Peregrini not only wants to preserve the material heritage of her studio and living space, but also the immaterial heritage of friendship, respect, culture and art. In WWII, Castrum Pererini served as a hiding place where spiritual and artistic freedom was the greatest survival tool.

This freedom also plays a central role in the film by Lynn Herschman that follows Folkersma’s introduction. It is about the relationship between the feminist art movement and the anti-war movement in the 1970s. The film has an impressive beginning: visitors of the Whitney Museum in New York are asked to name three female artists. They can only think of Frida Kahlo. The movie continues and a long impressive list of female artists comes along. Artists such as Judy Chicago, Nancy Spero, Howardena Pindell and Judith Baca, names I have never heard of; names that young artist and art student Janine Antoni has never heard of and names that – in literature – seem unfindable in the libraries of America. The three words that describe the feminist art movement are still relevant today: Women Art Revolution.

 

Bianca Stigter, Marjan Schwegman and Pieter Paul Pothoven present their work on the 6th of May. Bianca Stigter is former editor of the Dutch national newspaper NRC Handelsblad and one of the foremost cultural critics and historical writers in the Netherlands. Later this year, she will release the revised and richly illustrated edition ‘Atlas van een bezette stad’ (Atlas of an Occupied City). Stigter presents an impressive list of female resistance fighters like Frieda Belinfante, Rosa Boekdrukker, Marie Tellegen and Gesina van der Meulen. She also shows that many of these female heroes were related to each other, and part of the Amsterdam elite. Next is Marjan Schwegman, professor in Politics and Culture at the faculty of Humanities at Utrecht University. From 2007 to 2016 she was the managing director of NIOD (Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies). In her presentation she explains how the women Stigter talked about, became invisible. These women became partially invisible because historians often defined resistance on the basis of hard, ‘masculine’ characteristics. In the work of Loe de Jong, women are virtually absent because, as a typical man of his time, he does not include how the people in hiding were taken care of.

The role of women, who appear in the Dutch history of the resistance, is mostly described as supporting in the form of a courier. The role as courier became the focusing-point, though at the same time, Jacoba van Tongeren for instance, was not only a courier but also had a leading role in the famous group 2000.

Schwegman is interested in the dilemma of using violence, especially because religion was very important in people’s lives at the time.

Multimedia artist Pieter Paul Pothoven researches Amsterdam based socialist resistance groups, like RARA and CS6 before, during and after the war, in which both men and women played active roles. He is also interested in the dilemma of using violence: how can this history be presented without falling into nostalgia and glorification of violence? He states that it all depends on your view on life: are you already seeing violence all around you? And what does the term violence mean? Some people see the exclusion of refugees as violent.

In the round table discussion afterwards, Pothoven states that the mainstream historiography is very patriarchal. He tries to put himself in the role of a young girl: what history books could I read in which I recognize myself? A member of the audience asks what it means that Pothoven, again as a man, is writing down this history of women. But why should men always account for this? Asks Schwegman: “I have written about men and I have never had this question.”

 

The third and last day of talks has a very different feeling than the day before: more personal and vulnerable, and this is mainly because the speakers tend to put themselves into the position of someone else. What the speakers have in common is their struggle with the theme “truth”.

Aya Johanna Daniëlle Dürst Britt holds an MFA from Leiden Unicersity in Islamic studies. She is an editor of the online al.arte.magazine, which publishes articles in Dutch and English about art, culture and society in relation to Islam. In Leiden she studied the life and work of Hasrad Inayat Khan, the founder of the Universal Sufism, and father of Noor Inayat Khan: resistance fighter and first female radio operator to be sent from Britain into occupied France to aid the French Resistance. Apart from an impressive ancestry, with royals and a long line of mystics and musicians, she also grew up hearing Dutch, as her father’s organisation would develop into the universal Sufi Movement in the West. It has a significant branch in the Netherlands, especially in the city of The Hague. Noor Inayat Khan built up a resistance group, but was betrayed by a jealous woman. This lead to her being imprisoned for several years, and eventually, a death sentence. Her last word, before her execution, was: ‘Liberté!’. This could be interpreted in the spiritual sense she grew up with: spiritual freedom. Britt asks herself the question: “What would I do? I am like her, I love music, art, and mysticism. Would I sacrifice myself?”

Ronit Porat works with photographic materials and combines them with biographical texts and materials from archives. She was born in a Kibbutz in the north of Israel, where history played an essential role in the formation of both personal and national narratives. When she finds a story that touches her in a way, she adds a layer of imagination and very often an autobiographical layer. She states that she is not very interested in the “truth”, because there is no such thing as truth. She really enjoys spending time in archives but finds it difficult to get access. Later in the round table discussion an audience member presses the fact that archives are constructed, and that fiction and history cannot be separated.

Annet Mooij, researcher and writer working on a biography of Gisèle recognizes this. Histories are stories, filled with affection and emotions. This makes writing the life story of Gisèle so very difficult. “My task is to add some meaning, logic or even a question mark to the stories. The story behind the story is impossible to find.”

Of course the weekend is about the Female Perspective, but Gisèle herself really struggled with the term femininity. In the period of her resistance in the war, she was responsible for the money, in that way she wasn’t ‘female’ at all! Later, one of the hiders accused her of being too masculine: “You made use of my male part, now you accuse me of being too masculine!?” In a letter to her husband, mayor Arnold d’Ailly, she even writes that she hates being a woman. Besides, Gisèle never focused on herself as a ‘female artist’. In that perspective it’s even more interesting that a weekend like this is, which is focussing exactly on the female aspect of artists and resistance fighters, is being organised in her former studio. What would she think of that?

 

Remembering is the only repetition. Remembering is the only confusion. No matter how complicated anything is, if it is not mixed up with remembering, there is no confusion. (Insistence, Andrea Greyer)

This quote of the screened movie sums up this artist weekend for me. I ended up having more questions after the weekend than I had before. What is resistance? What does female resistance mean? What is truth?

Reasonable Doubt – Mieke Bal

Exhibition

Reasonable Doubt by Mieke BalReasonable Doubt_Mieke Bal 18 maart 2017 Photo by Przemo Wojciechowski

Opening Saturday March, 18th at 17 hrs

Reasonable Doubt (2016), the latest film project by cultural theorist and critic Mieke Bal, is an experiment to audio-visualise ‘thought’. Mixing docu-drama with theoretical fiction, the project stages scenes from the lives of philosopher René Descartes (1596-1650) and the Swedish Queen Kristina (1626-1689).

Reasonable Doubt is on show till 13 April 2017, open Tuesday till Friday 12 – 18 hrs.

Thursday 13 april, exhibition is closed at 15:30 hrs

Artist Talk: Mieke Bal on Reasonable Doubt 

On March 30, Mieke Bal will talk about ‘thinking in film’: an experiment to audio-visualise thought. In accordance with her concept of ‘thinking as a social process’, this talk will not be like lecturing ‘at’ people, but sharing the excitement of discovering how things work.  RSVP productie@castrumperegrini.nl

read here the review by Jeroen Lutters published in MetropolisM: “Hommage aan Mieke Bal”

Nieuw: De Kaarten van Gisèle

Nieuw, nu verkijgbaar

Kunsttarot – De Kaarten van Gisèle

lancering: zaterdag 1 April 16 – 18 hrs

Het kunstenaarscollectief DE PARASIET  maakte een selectie uit de vele objecten uit het atelier van Gisèle (1912-2013) en schreven er telkens een korte tekst bij die tezamen een serie serieuze, wonderlijke, wijze en ludieke levenslessen vormen in hun nieuwste KUNSTTAROT – De Kaarten van Gisèle die nu i.s.m. Castrum Peregrini wordt gepubliceerd.

Programma, na welkom & introductie

– het 1e exemplaar wordt overhandigt aan Susan Smit, auteur van o.a. de historische roman ‘Gisèle’
Sietske Sikkes over de werking van het geheugen. Sikkes is senior onderzoeker bij het VUMC/ Alzheimer Centrum
Jarry Porius over de verwachtingen, met welke verwachtingen zal het Tarot het beste voor je werken. Porius is als senior researcher verbonden aan de TU Delft en aan de Erasmus Universiteit
– masterclass tarot met aansluitend privé massaleggingen,
Met op zaterdag 1 april de speciale aanbieding: € 12,50 voor aanschaf van het Kunsttarot – De Kaarten van Gisèle

Of bestel dit bijzondere Kunsttarot nu via productie@castrumperegrini.nl – De Kaarten van Gisèle € 16,95 excl. porto kosten

Het Kunsttarot – De Kaarten van Gisèle wordt in een beperkte oplage geproduceerd.

Het Kunsttarot – De Kaarten van Gisèle in de media:

 

 

 

Critically Committed Pedagogies – Amber Coomans

Critically Committed Pedagogies, #2

A recap of  a semi-public seminar

by Amber Coomans

March the 10th is a vibrant day in Castrum Peregrini. Together with Dr. Esther Peeren, (University of Amsterdam, ASCA and Amsterdam Centre for Globalisation Studies), Professor Peter Kraftl (University of Birmingham), Jack Halberstam (Professor of Gender Studies and English at Columbia University) and the moderators Renee Turner and Frans-Willem Korsten, the students of the Piet Zwart Institute and many other guests immerse themselves in “critically committed pedagogies.” Although the word critical may sound as a cliché, Frans-Willem Korstens states, together with the word committed, it’s exactly what this seminar is about.

Esther Peeren

The seminar begins with Dr. Esther Peeren talking about where we teach and how the spaces in which we teach influence learning. She’s inspired by philosopher Michail Bachtin and his so-called chronotopes: intrinsic connectedness of temporal and spatial relationships that are artistically exposed in literature. There is the chronotope of the adventure novel, in which the main character always forgets the things he has learned in the previous episodes and is constantly surprised by everything. In this world learning is not possible. Another example is the chronotope of the Road, in which meeting new people from different backgrounds is central. Bachtin states that these chronotopes also exist in the real world.

The chronotope of the Salon is the place where dialogues can happen and where there is a more dialogic and interactive atmosphere. Perhaps this is an example of what a classroom should look like?

What does it mean to have this seminar at Castrum Peregrini? You could see the former WWII hiding place as a learning space for the hiders. They continued learning by writing and discussing, as in the chronotope of the Salon.

The discussion then turns to the VOC-room in the University of Amsterdam where the faculty of Humanities is now seated. How does the history of this place influence the learning processes that characterize this place? And what does it mean that this hasn’t really been discussed? Our heritage from WWII seems to be allowed to haunt us, as shown by the popularity of the Anne Frank house, but our colonial history isn’t. Why is this the case? Peeren concludes with Bachtin, who explained that learning is an internal conflict: It’s going to be difficult! That internal conflict, or internal dialogue is not ignored at Castrum Peregrini. It is a learning space and thinking space where attention is paid to time and space. If more learning places such as universities would pay more attention to time and space, we would achieve different ways of learning, resulting in more inclusion.

To end with a clever statement from one of the students: It’s not about what the space does to you, it’s who you become because of the space that matters.

Peter Kraftl

The second talk of the day is given by professor Peter Kraftl. He talks about his research on geographies of alternative education, and alternative childhoods in the UK, which is fuelled by his interest in space and place, being a geographer.

Alternative childhoods question standard ways of testing and the way children’s bodies are treated in schools. They create spatial ways of learning. Examples are the so-called forest-schools in Denmark, where the pupils are largely being taught outside in nature, the Kilquhanity Democratic school in Scotland, where teachers and pupils come together every week to discuss what will happen next week in a completely democratic way, and the Findhorn Foundation in Scotland which is more spiritual. What was striking in his research is the fact that teachers in alternative schools speak about love so often. Love as a completely non-sexual, non-romantic emotion. In mainstream society these senses of love are touched upon, but not as frequent. One of Kraftl’s respondents states that we need to see something like love as something bigger than just between two people: love as a responsibility. Kraftl concludes that we need to see alternative childhoods as autonomous, rather than seeing them as alternative. They are autonomous because most of the time they are independent and more outward-looking. They are distinct, but not divorced from the mainstream!

Another point of discussion in the room revolves around the issues of class and inequality in relation to alternative childhoods. It really depends on the places you go to, states Kraftl, because there is a huge diversity within alternative childhoods. It is an important topic.

Jack Halberstam responds to Kraftl’s talk by saying that love being defined as opposed to sexuality is nonsense and impossible. Kraftl agrees that it is indeed problematic to separate love and sex (and jokingly suggested perhaps a very British thing to do.)

A student presses the question whether it’s ethical to homeschool a child. Isn’t it a form of child abuse? Maybe it is, but maybe it’s abuse to put children in a learning environment with only people of the same age. A complicated but interesting subject with much to discuss about.

Jack Halberstam

The seminar ends with Jack Halberstam talking about frightful leaps into darkness based on Auto-Destructive Art. In Halberstam’s own words: from talks about utopian projects we now dive into total destruction at the end of the day.

‘Art without a safety net’ is what Halberstam speaks about, in combination with why we might use queer theory to think differently about death. Why? We’re living in a world where life expectancy has been greatly increased. Also, technological investment happens so fast that we will reach the moment where we will have transcendent the physical condition of death. At least, this is what the trans humanists want us to believe. In a way, Halberstam states, we already are at that point because of IVF. People that normally wouldn’t be able to reproduce are able to now. You can see humanity move towards destruction and we have to think about reproduction and death differently. Auto destructive artists, like Gustav Metzker who lived in Amsterdam for a while in the 70s, aim to think about these subjects in a different way. Metzker has tried to shatter the sentimental investment in WWII, by making clear that the genocide continues and could easily happen again.

Halberstam ends with the following: let’s see if this archive of auto destructive art can give us a set of tools to think differently about embodiment, life, death, risk, safety, art, creativity, and violence. Is there anything within this archive that we can use for the current set of disasters that threaten us?

The contribution of Jack Halberstam was also broadcasted on Castrum Peregrini Facebook Live Feed, Friday 10th March.

As part of the project The Warp and Weft of Memory artist and writer Renée Turner took the initiative for a number of Critically Committed Pedagogies in the House of Gisèle on 20 January and 10 March 2017. The Warp and Weft of Memory is a research project by Renée Turner, which will result in an online narrative exploring the contents of Gisèle d’Ailly van Waterschoot van der Gracht’s wardrobe, and the ways in which it reflects her life, work, and larger histories through textiles and clothing. The Warp and Weft of Memory is made possible by the generous support of Mondriaan Fund

Amber Coomans studies heritage at Reinwardt Academie Amsterdam, and a minor Philosophy, Worl religions and Spirituatlity at HKU Utrecht. Amber joins team Castrum Peregrini on a voluntary basis.

 

Critically Committed Pedagogies, #2

Seminar

Critically Committed Pedagogies

Friday March 10th from 10:00 – 17:00

with contributions by:

Professor Peter Kraftl, chair in Human Geography College Director of Internationalisation at the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Birmingham.

Dr. Esther Peeren is Associate Professor of Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam, Vice-Director of the Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis (ASCA) and Vice-Director of the Amsterdam Centre for Globalisation Studies (ACGS).

Jack Halberstam is Professor of Gender Studies and English at Columbia University. Halberstam is the author of five books: Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters (Duke UP, 1995), Female Masculinity (Duke UP, 1998), In A Queer Time and Place (NYU Press, 2005), The Queer Art of Failure (Duke UP, 2011) and Gaga Feminism: Sex, Gender, and the End of Normal (Beacon Press, 2012)

Moderated by Renee Turner and Frans-Willem Korsten 

Working from the unique place and the history of Castrum Peregrini, the Master Education in Arts programme of the Piet Zwart Institute and Castrum Peregrini, will host this semi-public seminar. Examining unexpected sites and paradigms of learning, the aim is to plot spaces for maneuverability, if not resistance or possibilities for imagining and acting otherwise.

As this is a working seminar with limited space to facilitate discussion, reservation is required. This event is FULLY booked >> If you wish to reserve a place on the waiting list, please do so before Monday, March 6th. Send your request to: Susana Pedrosa Email s.m.de.melo.pato.pedrosa.de.jesus@hr.nl

Emerging hiStories 2017

Exhibition
Emerging HiStories 

Opening 27 January 2017, 17 hrs
On show until 10 March 2017
Open Tuesday – Friday, 12-18 hrs

The tradition of survival; stories and objects of refugees. Composed by Özkan Gölpinar and Nadette de Visser.

radio-1A collection of 20 symbolic objects and stories about flight, ordeal and growth. Through the stories and objects, collected at the Turkish-Syrian border, in the Netherlands and in Germany, ‘we’ connect with ‘the other’. Emerging [Hi]Stories tells the story about the condition humain of being a refugee. Placed in the studio of Gisèle, these objects and stories create a dialogue with the history of Castrum Peregrini.  Read more.

Home and Belonging

Round Table Conversation
Home and Belonging

Tuesday 28 February 2017, 20.00 hrs

Havaintokuva_PulkkinenWhile the ongoing war in Syria has caused millions of people to be displaced rendering them homeless, questions of identity and home have become acutely topical. Castrum Peregrini and the Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux are organizing a discussion event on the topic of “Home and Belonging”, investigating mobility of people and belongings.

Anssi Pulkkinen will open the discussion by presenting his new art work Street View (Reassembled), see picture. Pulkkinen, born 1982, is a visual artist living and working in Helsinki. Umayya Abu-Hanna an Amsterdam-based journalist and writer with palestinian roots, , Annukka Vähäsöyrinki is the Head of Programme at the Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux, and is currently producing the Mobile Home(less) project. She will discuss the process of the formation of value anMobile Homelessd function, but also the utopias and realities of human migration.Rana (A.J) Noman, Yemen, writer, social researcher. Rana is also represented in the exhibition Emerging hiStories with an object and a story.  Moderation: Özkan Gölpinar publicist and a member of the Dutch Cultural Council and co-curator of the exhibition Emerging hiStories.

Read more here.

Art As Resistance, #1 – by Leon Laskus

Art As Resistance,#1

Seminar on Saturday 4 February 2017

organized by Framer Framed, Humanity in Action and Castrum Peregrini

von: Leon Laskus

Am Samstag, den 04. Februar, startete erfolgreich der erste Teil der Symposiumsreihe „Art as Resistance, #1“ auf dem Intellectual Playground Castrum Peregrini in Zusammenarbeit mit Framer Framed und Humanity in Action.

Der Tag begann mit einem Grundsatzreferat der New Yorker Künstlerin Adeola Enigbokan, heute Professorin an der Universität von Amsterdam. Darauf folgten drei Workshops der Künstler Maria Guggenbichler, Charl Landvreugd und Patricia Kaersenhout zu kulturellen Identitäten, das kollektive Gedächtnis und über die Notwendigkeit Geschichte, wie sie präsentiert wird, zu hinterfragen.

Ich, seit einem halben Jahr Freiwilliger im Castrum Peregrini, nahm Teil am Workshop „Rewrite History“ von Patricia Kaersenhout. Nach dem die kulturelle Aktivistin und Performance Künstlerin ihre Ergebnisse ihrer bisherigen Werke präsentierte, war es die Aufgabe der Teilnehmer die Geschichte des Kolonialismus zu überarbeiten – in Sachbüchern oder als Collagen. Dabei sollten wir versuchen uns in eine Identität indigener Völker hineinzuverseIMG_3350tzen. Stift, Kleber und Messer waren dann unser Werkzeug die aus der zweiten Hälfte des letzten Jahrhunderts stammenden Bücher, welche zum Teil noch Rassenlehre beinhalteten, zu befreien.

Es war eine Art von kollektiver Kunst. Zuvor hatten Menschen mit diesen Büchern gearbeitet und mit deren Bildmaterial Collagen gestaltet. Patricia gab uns den Hinweis auf Affinität: Wir würden feststellen, dass wir mit jenen verbunden seien, die zuvor in dieser Weise an diesen Büchern arbeiteten. Und, es stimmte: ehe ich die übermalten, entfernten und ausradierten christlichen Symbole bemerkte, die im Geschichtsbuch nahezu überall verteilt waren, hatte ich schon begonnen die Kirchen aus den Bildern herauszuschneiden.

Nach dem Abschluss unserer Werke und das Auffassen von dem, was bereits andere vor mir im Buch getan haben, wurde es mir wieder deutlich, dass Geschichte sehr unterschiedlich präsentiert werden kann. Durch die neu gestalteten Bücher, wie auch Texte, ergab sich ein neuer Sinn der Zusammenhänge des Vergangenem. Aus der Sicht von vielen „Indianern“ also, würde beispielsweise eher „the Devil“ über den Köpfen der Kolonialherren stehen, als der Name mit sämtlichen prunkvollen adligen und militärischen Titeln.

Es zeigte sich mir, dass Kunst ein wunderbares Instrument sein kann, um aus einem Mainstream Geschichtsbild auszubrechen und durch so entstehende kritische Betrachtung des Mediums sein gewohntes Denkmuster der Geschichte zu ändern.

Leon Laskus volunteers during a year at Castrum Peregrini via Action Reconciliation Service for Peace ARSP a.k.a. ‘Aktion Sühnezeichen / Friedensdienste’. After finishing his school ‘Abitur’ in Berlin, he applied for a country and an organisation.  Every year around 180 volunteers, mostly aged between nineteen and twenty five are active for ARSP in thirteen different countries on a variety of educational, historical, political and social projects. For over 50 years ARSP has been committed to working toward reconciliation and peace, as well as fighting racism, discrimination and social exclusion. read more about ARSP

Conflicting Memories: Ukraine

Round Table Conversation
Conflicting Memories: Ukraine
A political crisis from a cultural perspective, part 2

due to circumstances: 16 February 2017 was POSTPONED >> a NEW date will be announced soon 

Language: English
Price: 7,50 euro, reduced fee 5 euro
RSVP at productie@castrumperegrini.nl

A collaboration between Castrum Peregrini and the European Cultural Foundation

Participants: Ivan Krastev, Centre for Liberal Strategies, Sofia, Vasyl Cherepanyn, Visual Culture Research Centre, Kyiv and laureate of the ECF Princess Margriet Award (2015) and Fleur de Weerd, journalist and former correspondent in Ukraine.

The participants will each give a short contribution on their view of the current conflict from the perspective of collective memory, followed by a panel discussion including the public moderated by Katherine Watson, director ECF.

Read more here.

and / or here

Art As Resistance, #1

Seminar
Art as Resistance, #1

Saturday 4 February, 11 – 17 hrs

Framer Framed, Humanity in Action and Castrum Peregrini are joining forces for a three part symposium series Art as Resistance. Our first edition starts with a key note lecture by artist & urbanist Dr. Adeola Enigbokan. Her manifesto:

ART & AFFINITY

In the wake of recent world events, art should help us to modify the groups or classes into which we organize ourselves. Art could also help us transform our thinking around where, and to whom, we belong. Art should create experiences that challenge us, forcing us to ask:

who are our “natural” companions?
who is our “true” family?
where do our obligations lie?
what are the stories we insist on telling ourselves about our “family,” our “nation,” and how can we leave these stories behind and tell new stories?

Art should constantly form and re-form us into associations along affinities we could not have imagined on our own.

After the keynote speech by Adeola Enigbokan after the lunch three interactive parallel workshops given by Maria Guggenbichler, Charl Landvreugd and Patricia Kaersenhout.

Programme

Patricia Kaersenhout

Patricia Kaersenhout

11.00-11.30 Doors open, coffee/tea and registration workshops
11.30-11.35 Welcome
11.35-12.20 Keynote by Adeola Enigbokan

12.20-13.00 Discussion/Q & A
13.00-14.00 Lunch
14.00-16.00 Parallel Workshops
16.00-16.20 Plenary wrap up
16.20-17.00 Drinks

See our Facebook Event for more information. Please make sure to book your Ticket(s) now.

Seminar on Critical Pedagogies

Seminarcritical pedagogies

Critical Pedagogies

Friday 20 January 2017

Friday 10 March 2017

From January through March 2017, Castrum Peregrini will host the Master Education in Arts students from the Piet Zwart Institute. The group will be meeting regularly in both Rotterdam and Amsterdam for a seminar on critical pedagogies.

Co-taught by Prof. Frans-Willem Korsten (The University of Leiden) and artist, Renee Turner, the seminar looks at critical pedagogies in the plural, meaning a range of educational theories with one common denominator, the term ‘critical’, which refers to the ability to analyze the social, cultural, pedagogical and institutional processes that are inherent to every form of education.

The seminar will also include a semi-public event on March 10th with guest speakers: Peter Kraftl (Chair in Human Geography at the University of Leicester), Esther Peeren (Associate Professor of Globalisation Studies at the Media Studies Department at the University of Amsterdam) and Jack Halberstam (Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Gender Studies and Comparative Literature at the University of Southern California).

 

If interested please send us an email: mail@castrumperegrini.nl

More information on the event and registration will follow.

Home and Belonging

Roundtable Discussion
Home and Belonging

28 February 2017, 20.00 hrs

Mathhew Wiebe Unsplash photo-1423958290593-a8eff6d8e583While the ongoing war in Syria has caused millions of people to be displaced rendering them homeless, questions of identity and home have become acutely topical. Castrum Peregrini and the Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux are organizing a discussion event on the topic of “Home and Belonging”, investigating mobility of people and belongings. The panel of speakers will discuss the process of the formation of value and function, but also the utopias and realities of human migration.

Havaintokuva_PulkkinenThe discussion event is part of the Finnish Cultural Institute’s artistic project Mobile Home(less). The institute has commissioned a new artwork, Street View (Reassembled), from Finnish sculptor Anssi Pulkkinen.  The art work is dealing with present day homelessness, and takes as its starting point ruins of a destroyed Syrian home, to create an installation that brings a caravan-like, mobile, temporary street view into an urban European city space. The work brings homelessness from behind news images into our everyday reality. The artist will be present at the event.

Castrum Peregrini’s exhibition Emerging [Hi]-Stories also looks at the symbolic value of material and objects as they move from one place to another. The exhibition (open 27.1.-10.3, Tue-Fri, 12-18 hrs) shows objects chosen of refugees to take with them on their journey and the stories they tell.

 

SPEAKERS

Umayya Abu-Hanna is an Amsterdam-based journalist and writer. Originally from Palestine, Abu-Hanna spent many years living and working in Finland prior to her re-location to the Netherlands. She has worked at the Finnish Broadcasting Company, Yle, as a columnist for the Finnish daily Helsingin Sanomat, as a multi-cultural expert at the for the Finnish National Gallery and a board member of the Finnish Central Art Council. At the moment she works as an adviser in Pakhuis de Zwijger, a cultural organisation in Amsterdam.

Özkan Gölpinar is publicist and a member of the Dutch Cultural Council. The Cultural council is the legal advisory organ of the Dutch government on the arts, culture and media. He was attached to the Leiden University Center for the Arts in Society on the research program Contemporary Art Beyond Boundaries. As program maker he was attached to the Mondriaan Foundation and the Foundation for The Arts, Design and Architecture (BKVB).  He has 20 years’ experience as reporter with:  Volkskrant, Trouw etc. Gölpinar has written several books, essays, theatre plays, and documentaries.

Aleksi Malmberg is the director of the Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux. Amongst other things, he has worked as the programme manager for the Helsinki Festival, the largest cross-disciplinary art festival in the Nordic countries, the managing director for publishing house Tactus, as well as the executive director for Our Festival. The common thread of his manifold professional history has been the relationship of influence between art and society, and he has, for example, edited the history of Kulttuuritalo, a concert venue in Helsinki that has functioned at the collision point of politics and culture.

 

Partners

Castrum Peregrini, ‘the fortress of the pilgrim’, is the nom de guerre of a WWII safehouse in the city centre of Amsterdam. Driven by her beliefs of art and friendship artist Gisèle van Waterschoot van der Gracht (1912 – 2013) helped young intellectuals and artists survive the war by offering them refuge in her house. Many parts of this canal house remain unchanged, making its history palpable. The human values of the House of Gisèle have grown and deepened in post-war years. On this background, Castrum Peregrini has developed into a lively house which organizes debates, publications and exhibitions.

The Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux is an independent, non-profit cultural organisation located in Brussels. As part of the network of Finnish Cultural and Academic Institutes abroad, it serves as a liaison between stakeholders in the field of culture from Finland and the Benelux countries. The Institute is an expert organisation which offers artists and organisations opportunities to create discussion, new projects and new possibilities of collaboration.

Conflicting Memories: Ukraine

 Round Table Conversation

Conflicting Memories: Ukraine
A political crisis from a cultural perspective, part 2

16 February 2016, 20.00 hrs12-debat by Pip Erken

Language: English
Price: 7,50 euro, reduced fee 5 euro
RSVP at productie@castrumperegrini.nl

A collaboration between Castrum Peregrini and the European Cultural Foundation

 

Participants: Ivan Krastev, Centre for Liberal Strategies, Sofia, Vasyl Cherepanyn, Visua10-debat by Pip Erkenl Culture Research Centre, Kyiv and 2015 laureate of the ECF Princess Margriet Award and Fleur de Weerd, journalist and former correspondent in Ukraine.

The participants will each give a short contribution on their view of the current conflict from the perspective of collective memory, followed by a panel discussion including the public moderated by Katherine Watson, director ECF.

The conflict in Ukraine is often seen in a global perspective: geopolitical spheres seem to compete again, often with reference to cold war rhetoric.
On the ground the conflict has another dimension: clashing collective memories resulting in seemingly different cultural identities. Panellists will try to deconstruct cultural reference points that form the basis of the conflict and talk about what would be needed to construct new, inclusive narratives.

The evening follows up a similar discussion one-and-a-half years ago, when the images of the Maidan clashes where still fresh in mind. What has happened since, what is the perspective for Ukrainian identity internally and internationally at the moment?

On the participants:

Ivan Krastev is the Chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, and permanent fellow at the IWM Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna. He is a founding board member of the European Council on Foreign Relations, e.a. He was ranked in the 2008 Top 100 Public Intellectuals Foreign Policy/Prospect List. Since 2004, he has been the executive director of the International Commission on the Balkans chaired by the former Italian Prime Minister Giuliano Amato.

Vasyl Cherepanyn is director of the Visual Culture Research Center (Kiev), works as a senior lecturer at the Cultural Studies Department of the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, and is an editor of Political Critique magazine. Cherepanyn holds a Ph.D. in philosophy (specialisation – aesthetics). He has also worked as a guest lecturer at the Institute for Advanced Studies of the Political Critique in Warsaw, Poland and the Krupp Wissenschaftskolleg Greifswald of the Greifswald University, Germany.

Fleur de Weerd is a historian, and independent journalist, who has written extensively about Germany and the former Soviet Union for various newspapers in the Netherlands and Belgium. She was the official correspondent for Dutch daily Trouw in Ukraine during the Euro-Cup Soccer championship and has visited the country often in 2014. Her book Het land dat maar niet wil lukken was awarded the prestigious Bob den Uyl-prijs for best literary travelogue. It recounts various diverse and complex (hi)stories of Ukraine and its inhabitants.

see also at the European Cultural Foundation

share our invitation: Conflicting_Memories_Ukraine_ECF and CP_16Feb2017

 

Important Souvnirs

Exhibition

Amie Dicke: Important Souvnirs

castrum_24On show until 23 december 2016 during guided Visits House of Gisèle and during events.
Important Souvnirs is also part of Amsterdam Art Weekend 24-27 November

Since 2009 Amie Dicke is attracted to the house of Castrum Peregrini, its interiors and its stories. She has made work related to the place, in situ or conceptually. Her artistic interventions have challenged the development of the place. Simultaneously the place had a significant impact on the artistic development and the works of Dicke. Starting off with bold statements like the work Claustrophobic (2009) her perspective and approach has changed from that of an intervenor towards that of an observer, reading traces, isolating images from their contexts and therefore challenging our perspectives. Since 2014 Dicke has put her focus on the private apartments and the studio of Castrum Peregrini founder, the artist Gisèle van Waterschoot van der Gracht (1912 – 2013). Dickes research fed into important-souvnirs.com named after a brief note by Gisèle: ‘do not touch I am sorting Important Souvnirs’ During the whole autumn season – in conjunction with other events – Castrum Peregrini will show work of Dicke within the historic contexts that are challenged by the work.

During Amsterdam Art Weekend, on Friday 25, Saturday 26 & Sunday 27 November from 14.00 – 15.00 hrs Amie Dicke will illustrate her approach in situ, from the historic material in the House of Gisèle to the outcomes presented in the studio of Gisèle.  Upon resservation only through mail(at)castrumperegrini.nl. Price: 10 euro per person in groups of 12 persons max. See http://weekend.amsterdamart.com/event/important-souvnirs-amie-dicke

screening ‘Herengracht 401’

Film Screening

‘Herengracht 401’ poster

Tuesday 20 December, 20 hrs

A documentary about the fascinating house of ‘Castrum Peregrini’ and a document that shows from different perspectives how the memory of the house is captivated and owned. ‘Herengracht 401’ had its première at the Dutch Film Festival in Utrecht last September 2016. And will make a tour in the art house cinemas in the Netherlands and abroad. A film by Janina Pigaht. With aftwards a talk moderated by Rosemarie Buikema, professor Gender studies University of Utrecht. 

Tuesday 20 December entrance: € 7,50, reduced € 5,-

RSVP: mail@castrumperegrini.nl

Residencies supported by Mondriaan Fund

2017 artists in the residence at Castrum Peregrini supported by the Mondriaan Fund

 

March & April 2017: Pieter Paul Pothoven 

pothoven_castrum_peregrini_2017

The work of Pieter Paul Pothoven (1981, NL) comprises sculpture, installation, and includes different forms of writing as well. In his projects, he searches for alternative ways of engaging with the past through study of historical sites, artifacts and resources, in ord

logo-downloads-en-web-rood

er to mediate new relationships with history often based on their potential use-value in the present. During a 2-month residency at Castrum Peregrini, he will continue to study socialist resistance before, during and after the Second World War in Amsterdam. Central to his project is a comparative study of three groups that organized their actions in radically different times but share similar motives.

pothoven_castrum_peregrini_2017Pieter Paul Pothoven received his BFA at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam (NL) and his MFA at Parsons The New School of Design, New York. He was a resident at Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown (US), Van Eyck Academie, Maastricht (NL) and Instituto Sacatar, Salvador (BR). His work has been shown in various solo and group exhibitions. Recent exhibitions include: ‘You talkin’ to me?’, Barbara Seiler, Zürich (CH); ‘Sunsets never looked as stunning as through the haze of factory sooth’, Van Eyck Acadamie, Maastricht (NL); ‘Territorial Drift’, Garage, Rotterdam (NL); ‘Listen to the Stones, think like a mountain’, Tatjana Pieters, Ghent (BE); ‘Lapis Lazuli from Serr-i-Sang’, PuntWG, Amsterdam (NL); ‘11:59, on a date of no particular significance’, Hudson D. Walker gallery, Provincetown (US); ‘The intelligence of Things’, The Kitchen, New York (US). He initiated and co-curated ‘Weight of Colour’, a symposium about the materiality of color, Amsterdam (NL) and the group exhibition ‘I scarcely have the right to use this ghostly verb’, New York, (US). His texts have been published in amongst others: Anamesa Journal, Simulacrum, Volume, De Gids and Beyroutes, an Alternative Guide to Beirut. Currently he lives and works in Amsterdam. pieterpaulpothoven.com

 

October & November 2017: Aimée Zito Lema
Rond de Jambe, video still, 2015

Rond de Jambe, video still, 2015

Expanding an insignificant event, isolating a sudden movement, choosing an affective gesture and zeroing in on it until we lose ourselves in the sounds it emits, the grain of the photo or the word that names it, furnishes us with a chance to reinterpret the events as they are presented to us, and of understanding history from new perspectives.

The Subversive Body, 2016 / Installationview @ Wilfried Lentz Rotterdam/ Photo: Sander van Wettum

The Subversive Body, 2016 / Installationview @ Wilfried Lentz Rotterdam/ Photo: Sander van Wettum

Aimée Zito Lema grounds her practice in this premise. Based on a process of selection and appropriation, Zito Lema zooms in on the detail of gestures, often by using archive images taken of working class demonstrations or counter-cultural movements. This motif, once enlarged almost to the point of abstraction, brings to mind the mechanism that enables cooperation and development within a community, or a movement, or an affective structure than bonds a group or a family. It is revealed to us in her work, just as a tiny detail can give rise to a community spirit and all that this brings with it. Her artistic practice structures the narrative around the process, triggering a dynamic that, taken together, lends meaning to the work. The idea leads to an expression, act or performance. This work in turn gives rise to the object that, inasmuch as a metaphor, returns us to the expression from which it came, only to be recycled and give birth to new possibilities.*

For her residency at Castrum Peregrini Zito Lema will focus on the role of friendship within adverse social-political circumstances.  She will research different notions of friendship in political contexts, taking as starting point the history of the house of Gisele van Waterschoot. Looking at past and present, searching for traces of these notions of friendship, understood as solidarity and support structure.

Portrait Aimée: Photo by Hugo Tillman

Portrait Aimée: Photo by Hugo Tillman

Visual artist Aimée Zito Lema (born in Amsterdam, 1982, grew up in Buenos Aires) studied at the University of the Arts, Buenos Aires, the Gerrit Rietveld Academy, Amsterdam, and followed the Master Artistic Research program of the Royal Academy in The Hague (2009 – 2011). She was artist-in-resident at the Rijksakademie (2015-2016). Her recent exhibitions include: The 11th Gwangju Biennale; The Dorothea von Stetten Award, Kunstmuseum Bonn; Hors Pistes: L’art de la Revolte, Centre Pompidou Paris (all in 2016); the long-term project Body at Work at Casco, Utrecht (2013 – 2014); and the residency ‘Het Vijfde Seizoen’, Den Dolder, (2011).